The Definitive Shroud of Turin FAQ

the shroud draws you in, doesn't let go, and reveals itself gradually

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How significant is it that the images on the Shroud are very faint?

When the image-bearing cloth of Edessa arrived in Constantinople, on August 15, A.D. 944, Gregory Referendarius, the archdeacon of Hagia Sophia, Constantinople’s great cathedral, described the cloth as having the likeness formed, it seemed, through sweat. There were other references that suggested the same thing.  This suggests that the image was faint.

When the prized relic arrived in the city with great fanfare, it was examined by Constantine VII, the co-emperor of Byzantine empire. A lengthy document, the Narratio de Imagine Edessena, tells us that the emperor described the image as “extremely faint, more like a moist secretion without pigment or the painter’s art.” That , too, is an important clue.

Symeon Magister’s Chronographia, from the same era, tells us that Constantine could see some image features but his two brothers-in-law, son’s of the other co-emperor Romanus, could barely see anything. This is all powerful evidence when all seven keys are considered that this Image of Edessa and the Shroud are one in the same.  

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